Academic Catalog 2013-2014 
    
    Jul 13, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2013-2014 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Undergraduate Academic Policies and Procedures



The academic program at Wayland Baptist University provides a broad liberal arts education in an environment which recognizes the worth, dignity, and potential of each student. Within this environment, students are provided a variety of opportunities designed to enable them to develop value judgments and principles for living drawn from the various liberal arts and grounded in an understanding of their relationship with God. In the setting of Christian community, the university’s academic programs reward sound scholarship, earnest effort, commitment to personal excellence, and the willingness to use one’s talents to serve both God and the human fellowship.

In keeping with this commitment, a general education core of courses and educational experiences form the foundation of each of the degree programs offered by the institution as well as the major and minor fields of study included in these programs. The general education core curriculum required for each of the university’s degrees is located in the Undergraduate Programs section.

Students are held responsible for knowing degree requirements, for enrolling in courses that fit within their degree program, and for taking courses in the proper sequence to ensure an orderly progression of work. Students are also held responsible for knowing and abiding by university regulations regarding the standard of work required to continue in the university.

Although students are viewed as individuals who possess the qualities of worth and dignity as well as the capacity for self-direction, in the interest of maintaining the university’s academic standards and sense of moral community, the institution reserves the right, through due process, to place on probation, suspend, or expel any student who provides false or misleading information, or who engages in classroom misdemeanor or academic dishonesty.

Notification of Rights Under FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are as follows:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the university receives a request for access.

    Students should submit to the registrar, dean of students, external campus executive director/dean, school dean, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
     
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.

    Students may ask the university to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the university official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the university decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the university will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.

    Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
     
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

    One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
     
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Wayland Baptist University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20202-5920.

Catalog Requirements

A student pursuing a course of study may choose to graduate in compliance with the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of first enrollment beyond the census date to the university or those of any subsequent catalog edition, provided that degree requirements are completed within six years of the ending date of the catalog selected. A student who wishes to use a subsequent catalog edition may not return to previous editions. Degree requirements must be from one catalog. The catalog is in effect from August 1 of the publication year through July 31 of the next calendar year.

Academic Advisement

Plainview Campus

The academic advisement program on the Plainview campus is designed to provide students with the assistance needed to plan a complete course of study appropriate to individual needs, interests and abilities. Prior to initial registration, the Office of the University Registrar will assign all students, according to their major, to the respective school. Each school dean assigns students to the faculty members in their academic school and reports back to the Office of the University Registrar. The assigned advisor is indicated on students’ registration packets and advisor assignments are posted in the academic school offices.

Students who are undecided about their majors are evenly distributed among faculty who assist in guiding the student until a major field of study is chosen. The Office of the University Registrar will provide advisor lists to each academic school before registration each semester. It is the students’ responsibility to make appointments with their advisor prior to each registration period. A registration form signed by the advisor is required for registration. To change the assigned undergraduate advisor, the student must petition the school dean. If the dean agrees to a change, the student, the Office of the University Registrar and the faculty members involved will be notified. Students will be provided an unofficial copy of their degree plans prior to the end of their first semester of enrollment. Students with an undecided major will receive a printout of the general education requirements common to all baccalaureate degrees. 

External Campuses

Students who desire to enroll at the external campuses will be provided counseling by trained academic advisors. The advisors will counsel the student regarding courses to be taken to complete their desired degree goals. Prior to registration and enrollment in a new term, an academic advisor will counsel the student regarding the schedule for the new term. Students will be provided a degree plan within six weeks of issuing of the Permit to Enter. Questions that students have regarding their degree plan will be referred to academic advisors on the student’s primary campus.

The university seeks to provide continuing academic advisement; however the ultimate responsibility of knowing and fulfilling degree requirements listed in the catalog rests with the student.

Definition of Full-Time, Degree-Seeking Student

To be classified as full-time, a student enrolled in classes on the Plainview campus must be enrolled for the semester hours indicated below:

Fall and spring semesters 12 semester hours each semester
Microterms 3 semester hours each term

To be classified as full-time, a student attending classes at an external campus must be enrolled for nine (9) semester hours each long term.

Student Course Load

A normal class load for a Plainview student is 15-18 hours per term. Students on academic probation on the Plainview campus are restricted to 13 semester hours. An enrollment of more than 18 semester hours must be approved by the executive vice president/provost for academic services. A student who works more than 20 hours per week should carry fewer than the normal academic load. A fully employed student is encouraged to take no more than six hours per semester. A maximum of four semester hours may be earned in a three-week microterm.

A normal class load for a student on an external campus is 9 hours per term. Students on academic probation on an external campus are restricted to no more than 9 semester hours. An enrollment of more than 15 semester hours in a term 11 weeks or less must be approved by the respective school dean or the external campus executive director/dean.

Degree Plans

Prior to declaring a major field of study, students should register for only those courses included in the university general education core. This will ensure that all courses completed will satisfy degree requirements. After declaring the degree, major, and minor being pursued, students will be provided with a degree plan by the registrar’s office through their advisor. The original copy of this plan is filed in the university registrar’s office. All students who have 60 or more hours must have an official degree plan on file in the University Registrar’s office. The degree plan will list those courses required to satisfy the university and degree specific general education core, major, and minor requirements. Students changing their major or minor fields of study after having official degree plans completed must have their file amended with the University Registrar’s office. There will be a $10 fee for each amended degree plan. Most programs of study specify the academic degree which will be sought. Students pursuing teacher certification must have their degree plan audited by the teacher education coordinator to ensure that the plan also meets the respective state certification requirements.

Petition for a Course Substitution

Under certain circumstances, substitutions for required courses may be necessary and appropriate. Substitutions in the university or degree specific general education core must be recommended by the Academic Council. The student must submit a letter to the Academic Council requesting a course substitution. The letter should be submitted to the executive vice president/provost. Substitutions for courses required for academic majors and minors must be recommended by the appropriate dean. Substitutions for required courses for teacher certification may be recommended, if allowable under state certification policies, by the Don Williams School of Education dean. Final approval for course substitutions rests with the executive vice president/provost. The form to petition for course substitutions is available from the dean of the respective school, external campus executive director/dean, or the Office of the University Registrar. An electronic form is also available from the dean of the respective school or the external campus executive director/dean.

Definition of Program Concentrations

The university offers a number of program concentrations, see Academic Program Profile. In addition to the university or degree specific general education core, each degree offered by the university includes a major and a minor field of study, or composite major, and free electives, when needed, to complete degree requirements. Degree designations are based on those disciplines included as major fields of study. Concentrations offered and a brief description of each follow:

The Major

A concentration of at least 30 semester hours in a single discipline constitutes the major. The major must contain a minimum of 15 semester hours of upper-level credit. The university offers a major in 67 disciplines. A $10 fee will be assessed for each change of major after the initial request for degree plan. A minimum of 15 semester hours in the major must be completed at Wayland.

The Minor

A concentration of at least 18 semester hours in a single discipline constitutes the minor. The minor must contain a minimum of six semester hours of upper-level credit. The university offers a minor in 28 disciplines. A minimum of 6 semester hours in the minor must be completed at Wayland.

The Composite Major

A concentration of 36 to 51 semester hours in a combination of disciplines constitutes the composite major. Upper-level requirements for the composite major are included in that section of the catalog which addresses the specific composite major. Composite majors are offered in interdisciplinary studies for those preparing to become elementary school teachers. In addition, composite majors are offered in applied science, business administration, fitness management, human services, language arts, music, religion, social studies, and career and technology education.

The Specialization

A concentration of at least 18 semester hours in a single discipline constitutes the specialization. Specializations are included as a part of the following programs: the composite major in fitness management, the composite major in interdisciplinary studies, the major in business administration, the major in exercise and sport science, the major in religion, the major in religious education, and the 36 semester-hour composite major in the B.A.S. degree.

As a part of the B.A.S. degree, several specializations are available under each major.

As a part of the B.S.I.S. degree, a specialization is available in special education.

As a part of the B.B.A. degree, a specialization is available in accounting, business administration, economics and finance, health care administration, international management, management information systems, and management and marketing.

As a part of the major in religion, a specialization is available in pastoral ministry, pre-christian counseling, youth ministry, chaplaincy ministry, bi-vocational, and general Christian studies.

As a part of the major in religious education, a specialization is available in general religious education, education ministry, pre-Christian counseling, and youth ministry.

As a part of the major fitness management, a specialization is available in personal training and strength, recreation leadership and sport ministry, sport management and sports medicine and rehabilitation.

A $10 fee will be charged for each change of specialization after the initial request for degree plan.

Earning a Double Major

An academic school may provide the opportunity for a student to earn a double major while working toward the first undergraduate degree. Students wishing to pursue a double major will be required to meet all academic school and university requirements for each of the majors. Students who graduate with a double major will have a notation to that effect placed on their transcript.

Earning a Subsequent Baccalaureate Degree

Under certain circumstances a student may earn more than one baccalaureate degree from the university. However, under no condition can the degree designation for the subsequent degree be the same as that for the initial degree. For instance, if a previous degree is a Bachelor of Arts degree, the subsequent degree must be either a B.B.A., B.C.M., B.F.A., B.M., B.S., B.S.I.S., B.S.N., or B.A.S. To be eligible for a subsequent baccalaureate degree the student must:

  1. File an approved degree plan, which lists the requirements established for the subsequent degree.
  2. Meet all requirements, including university and degree specific general education requirements, established for the subsequent degree.
  3. Complete 30 semester hours beyond the minimum required for a previous degree(s). Of these 30 hours, 24 must be upper-level credits and 12 must be in the major.

Two degrees may not be awarded concurrently. To be eligible for honors, the student must have completed the required hours at Wayland and must meet the honors requirements; listed in the catalog in effect, on the date the degree plan for the subsequent degree was approved.

The Course Numbering System

Each course includes an academic discipline prefix followed by four numerals (Example: HIST 3305). The first numeral indicates the academic level of a course; Academic Achievement is indicated by a “0”; freshman-level courses by a “1”; sophomore-level courses by a “2”; junior/senior-level courses by a “3” or “4”; courses restricted to graduate students by a “5.”

After taking a higher level course, a student is not allowed to take the prerequisite of the course for credit. For example, if a student successfully completed MATH 1304 - College Algebra , the student would not be allowed to take ACAC 0325 - Pre-Algebra  and ACAC 0326 - Elementary Algebra  or MATH 1300 - Intermediate Algebra .

The second digit indicates the semester hour credit given for the course. The third and fourth digits represent the position of the course in the sequence of offerings by the discipline.

Example: HIST 3305

  HIST - History curriculum
  3 - Junior level course
  3 - Three semester hours credit
  05 - Fifth course in the sequence of history courses

Other indicators used in the numbering system include:

  1. Career and Technology courses are indicated by CTED prefix. 
  2. Hyphenated numbers, which indicate that the first semester course is usually a prerequisite to the second (GERM 1301-1302).
  3. Directed Study Courses indicated by a section number of 99 (HIST 3305.99 ). 
  4. Practicum Courses indicated by a 60-69 in the final two digits (EDUC 4361).
  5. Experimental/Special Courses indicated by a 79X in the final digits (ENGL 4379X). 
  6. Honor Courses indicated by a 90-99 in the final two digits (MATH 4691).

Definition of Courses

Lower-Level Courses

Those courses designated as freshman or sophomore level. At Wayland these are indicated by a “1” or “2” in the initial digit (Example: ENGL 1301 ).

Upper-Level Courses

Those courses designated as junior or senior level courses. At Wayland, these are indicated by a “3” or a “4” in the initial digit (Example: EDUC 3301 ). All degrees and most subcomponents of degrees (i.e., major, minor) require a specified number of upper-level credits.

Unique Courses

In addition to its lecture and laboratory courses, the university offers a number of courses to meet unique needs. These include:

Directed Study Courses

Directed study courses are those taken by independent study when schedule problems confront senior-level students or when a special program is designed for an individual student. They carry a section number of 99. The content and the degree of difficulty of a directed study course are the same as for the regular course for which it is substituted. The following restrictions and procedures apply to all directed study courses.

  1. A directed study course may not be taken during the same term in which the course is offered on the regular schedule.
  2. Directed study courses may be taken only in the student’s major or minor field, and at least 12 semester hours must have been completed in both the major and the minor.
  3. Courses taken by directed study must be junior or senior level, and they may not be substituted for lower-division courses in the general education requirements.
  4. Courses in the general education requirements may not be taken directed study. 
  5. Directed study courses may be offered only by full-time faculty members. 
  6. A maximum of six credit hours in directed study courses may be applied toward a degree.
  7. A minimum of one hour each week must be spent with the instructor, and at least 90 clock hours of study are normally required in addition to that time spent with the instructor.
  8. There are no directed studies at external campuses except those taught by full-time faculty and approved by the executive vice president/provost.
  9. Directed study courses must be requested on the appropriate form, which is available in the University Registrar’s office and must be signed by the student, faculty advisor, dean, and executive vice president/provost prior to registration. For students whose primary campus is external, the external campus executive director signature is also required.

Travel-Study Courses

Travel-study courses are designed as enrichment for regular course offerings within the various academic disciplines and require special approval by the Academic Council. Students participating in these courses must submit reservation fees at least four weeks before the departure.

Practicum Courses

Practicum courses are designed to provide the student with field experiences in a particular area of study.

Special Courses

Special courses are offered to complement course offerings in a department or school and to permit experimentation with a new subject. All special courses must be approved by the Academic Council prior to being offered.

Honors Courses

These courses are designed to challenge academically superior students and to assist them in developing initiatives and abilities beyond those expected in a normal course of study.

Definition of a Credit or Semester Hour

A semester hour is a unit of credit given for a minimum of 15 hours of lecture or 45 hours of laboratory per term. Each class hour generally requires an average of two hours of preparation by the student, with preparation times ranging from one to three hours per class hour. Although most courses are for three-semester hours credit, course credits vary. 

Definition of Grade Points

Grade points are earned as follows for each semester hour completed.

GRADE GRADE POINTS EARNED
A 4
B 3
C 2
D 1
F 0

Calculation of Grade Point Average (GPA)

The GPA is used to determine academic standing. Academic standing, in turn, affects a number of things including scholarships, athletic eligibility, and graduation honors. All hours taken, except where CR, NCR, W, WP, WF, I, IP, and X are received, are used to determine the GPA. In instances when a course is repeated, only the last grade and corresponding grade points are counted in the cumulative GPA (see Repetition of a Course). GPA is calculated on a 4.0 scale.

The Grading System

Grades for courses shall be recorded by the symbols below:

SYMBOL PERCENTAGE SYMBOL PERCENTAGE
A 90-100 D 60-69
B 80-89 F Below 60
C 70-79    

Other symbols used for grading include:

CR Credit Satisfactory, but without qualitative grading.
NCR No credit Unsatisfactory, but without qualitative grading.
Incomplete An incomplete may be given within the last two weeks of a long term or within the last two days of a microterm to a student who is passing, but has not completed a term paper, examination, or other required work for reasons beyond the student’s control.
IP In progress Assigned to a course indicating that at the conclusion of the semester the course was still in progress.
X No grade No grade has been submitted by the instructor. The course grade, which will replace the X must be submitted within 30 days from the beginning of the next full semester. An X can only be issued by the University Registrar’s Office.
Withdrawal Course(s) dropped or withdrawal from the university after census date, see Change of Schedule and Withdrawal from the University.
WP Withdrawal Passing Course(s) dropped or withdrawal from the university after the deadline to withdraw with a W and prior to the deadline to withdraw with a WP or WF, see Change of Schedule and Withdrawal from the University.
WF Withdrawal Failing  Course(s) dropped or withdrawal from the university after the deadline to withdraw with a W and prior to the deadline to withdraw with a WP or WF, see Change of Schedule and Withdrawal from the University.

Change of Grade

A change of grade (among the values A, B, C, D, F) may be made only if there has been an error in computation or recording of the grade, or if a change has been ordered as a result of the grade appeal process. A grade may not be changed because of consideration of work completed following the end of the grading period for which the grade was issued. The change is initiated by the instructor of record and approved by either the academic dean of the school of record or the external campus executive director/dean for courses completed at an external campus. For such a change to be valid, it must be submitted to the university registrar on or before the last day of the semester following the term in which the grade was originally issued, and on the form provided for that purpose.

Changing the Grade of Incomplete

A grade of incomplete is changed if the work required is completed prior to the last day of the next long (10-15 weeks) term, unless the instructor designates an earlier date for completion. If the work is not completed by the appropriate date, the I is converted to the grade of F. An incomplete notation cannot remain on the student’s permanent record and must be replaced by the qualitative grade (A-F) by the date specified in the official University calendar of the next regular term. An incomplete turned to a qualitative grade will be indicated by the notation I/grade on the student’s transcript.

Grade Reports

Grade reports are available to students at the end of the semester through the on-line student information system. Deficiency reports are sent at mid-semester to those students enrolled on the Plainview campus who have been reported as making unsatisfactory progress by their instructors. Only the final grade for a course is permanently recorded.

Credit By Examination

Wayland recognizes the validity of accepting credit for specified levels of achievement on institutionally approved, standardized examinations. Such credit will be assessed and treated as transfer credit. Official score reports must be received by Wayland prior to issuing credit. Scores posted on other institutions’ transcripts will not be viewed as official nor will be granted with the exception of ACT/SAT scores which appear on official high school transcripts. Duplicate credit will not be awarded - for example, three hours of credit in English for both ACT and CLEP credits. Students pursuing the B.A., B.B.A., B.F.A., B.M., B.S, B.S.N., and B.S.I.S. degrees may transfer a maximum of 30 semester hours earned as Credit by Examination; students pursuing the B.C.M. and B.A.S. degrees may transfer a maximum of 42 semester hours. A grade of CR will be assigned for all credit earned by examination except that credit earned through advanced standing examinations. No fee is charged for granting credit for ACT, AP, SAT I, CEEB, or CLEP/DANTES scores. Students may not challenge a course in any field in which credit has been given for a more advanced course. For example, credit for SPAN 1301 will not be issued from test credit when credit for SPAN 1302 has been earned previously. Students may not challenge a course in which a grade of F has been received. Test scores will not be accepted as upper-level (3000-4000 level) academic hours. Credit will only be granted if the minimum score or grade is earned for a specific program. Students who fail to meet minimum standards on credit by examination will be required to take the course as applicable to the degree program being sought. The score or grade earned by the student is not subject to appeal.

ACT and SAT Examinations 

Credit may be allowed for satisfactory scores on the English and mathematics sections of the ACT and SAT examinations. Students scoring 29 or above on the ACT English section or 620 or above on the SAT Writing section will be given credit for ENGL 1301 . Students scoring 26 or above on the ACT mathematics section or 550 or above on the SAT Mathematics section will be given credit for MATH 1304 . If the student takes the exam more than once, the highest available ACT or SAT subscores in math and English will be used for credit decisions.

CLEP/DANTES Examinations

Credit may be accepted for both the general and subject College Level Examination Placement (CLEP) tests. No credit will be accepted on the CLEP exam without the original score report. The minimum level acceptable for receiving credit for a CLEP exam is the B level. In some instances the ACE recommended score will be accepted. CLEP/DANTES credit will not be accepted as upper-level credit unless specified by CLEP/ DANTES.

As of July 1, 2010, students who wish to receive CLEP credit in English must take the subject exam titled College Composition Modular. The exam title College Composition will not be accepted for English credit. The essay for the College Composition Modular will be graded by a full-time Wayland English faculty member on the Plainview campus. The English CLEP exams are taken to receive college credits and are also used by Wayland for diagnostic purposes in advising students. After a student’s first term of enrollment at Wayland, the CLEP exam (College Composition Modular) may be taken only once. This applies to both the objective and essay parts of the English CLEP exam. Successful completion of both portions of the examination is required for credit in ENGL 1301  and/or ENGL 1302 .

Students who wish to receive CLEP credit in history must take the subject exams titled History of the United States I and History of the United States II (for six hours credit in U.S.) or Western Civilization I and Western Civilization II (for six hours credit for Western/World Civilization). The general exam titled Social Sciences and History will not be accepted for history credit.

Students who wish to receive CLEP credit in Biology or Chemistry may take the Biology or Chemistry CLEP Subject Exam. The General Examination titled Natural Sciences will not be accepted for science credit.

CEEB Tests

Three semester hours of credit may be awarded for each area of the College Entrance Examination Board Test (CEEB) on which the student scores 3 or better.

Advanced Placement Examinations

Wayland participates with the College Board by granting Advanced Placement (AP) credit when the AP courses and examinations compare favorably with the standards of Wayland and its individual schools. The following chart indicates the number of credit hours and courses that correspond with each minimum AP examination score. The following AP examinations will not be accepted for credit: Computer Science, Environmental Science, International English Language, Latin, Music Theory, and Physics C.

Exam Title Min. Grade Credit Courses
History of Art 3 3 ART 1301 
Studio Art 3 3 ART 1302 
Biology 3 8 BIOL 1401  - BIOL 1402 
Chemistry 3 4 CHEM 1401 
Chemistry 8 CHEM 1401  - CHEM 1402 
Economics - Macro 3 3 ECON 2307  
Economics - Micro 3 3 ECON 2308 
English - Language & Composition 3 3 ENGL 1301 
Literature & Composition 3 3 ENGL 1301 
Literature & Composition 4 6 ENGL 1301  - ENGL 1302 
French - Language 3 8   -  
French - Literature 3 6 FREN 2301  FREN 2302 
German Language 3 8   - 
Government and Politics - U.S. 3 3 POLS 2301 
History - U.S. 3 3 HIST 2301  - HIST 2302 
Mathematics - Calculus AB 3 3 MATH 2306 , MATH 2307 
Calculus AB 4 6 MATH 2306 , MATH 2307 
Mathematics - Calculus BC 3 6 MATH 2306 , MATH 2307 
Music Theory 3 8 MUSI 1401  - MUSI 1402 
Physics B 3 8    
Psychology 3 3 PSYC 1301 
Spanish - Language 3 8   - 
Spanish - Literature 3 6 SPAN 2301  - SPAN 2302 
Statistics 3 3 MATH 1306 

International Baccalaureate (IB) Program

Wayland Baptist University will consider credit for Higher Level (HL) examinations resulting in a grade of 4 or better on courses and examinations that compare favorably with the standards of Wayland Baptist University and its individual departments and schools. In order to receive credit, an official score report or IB transcript must be received by the university registrar. Transcripts may be obtained by written request from IB. Detailed information on ordering an IB transcript is available at http://www.ibo.org/ibna/graduates. To contact the IB:

International Baccalaureate North America
475 Riverside Drive, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10115
Tel: (212) 696-4464
Fax: (212) 889-9242
Email: IBNA@ibo.org
http://www.ibo.org
FAQ: http://www.ibo.org/faq/

The following chart indicates the course and number of credits granted based on HL examinations:

IB HL Test
Min Score
Credit Courses
Biology HL 5 4 BIOL 1400 *
Business and Management HL 6 3 Elective credit only
Chemistry HL 5 4 CHEM 1400 *
Chinese A1 & B1 HL 4 8   - 
Chinese A1 & B1 HL 5 11    , & CHIN 2301  
Chinese A1 & B1 HL 6 14  ,   , & CHIN 2302 
Computer Science HL 6 3 Elective credit only
Economics HL 6 3 Elective credit only
English Language A1 HL 4 3 ENGL 1301 
English Language A1 HL 5 6 ENGL 1301 -ENGL 1302 
Film HL 4 3 Elective credit only
French A1 & B1 HL 4 8   - 
French A1 & B1 HL 5 11    , & FREN 2301 
French A1 & B1 HL 6 14   , &  , & FREN 2302 
Geography HL 4 3 GEOG 1301 
German A1 & B1 HL 4 8   - 
German A1 & B1 HL 5 11   , & GERM 2301 
German A1 & B1 HL 6 14   ,  , & GERM 2302 
History HL 4 6   and 3 hours of elective
Information Technology in a Global Society HL 6 3 Elective credit only
Islamic History 4 3 Elective credit only
Japanese A1 & B1 HL 4 6 JAPN 1301  - JAPN 1302 
Music HL 4 3 MUSI 1303 
Physics HL 5 4 PHYS 1401 *
Psychology HL 4 3 PSYC 1301 
Social & Cultural Anthropology HL 4 3 Elective credit only
Spanish A1 & B1 HL 4 8   - 
Spanish A1 & B1 HL 5 11  ,  , & SPAN 2301 
Spanish A1 & B1 HL 6 14   ,  , &  SPAN 2302 
Sports, Exercise and Health Science 4 1 EXSS 1112 
Theatre HL 4 3 THEA 1303 
Visual Arts HL 4 3 ART 1301 

*Biology, Chemistry, and Physics HL examinations will only be accepted for students who are not pursuing a major from the School of Mathematics and Sciences.

Credit is currently not awarded in the following IB areas: Classical Languages, Environmental Systems and Societies, Mathematics, Philosophy, and World Religions.

Advanced Standing Examinations

Credit for a limited number of courses is available by advanced standing examinations. Although grade points and semester-hour credits earned through advanced standing examinations count toward the fulfillment of graduation requirements, they may not be counted toward the 30 hours of residency that must be taken at Wayland. Scholarships are not affected by student performance on these examinations.

The following procedures must be followed to ensure proper awarding of credit. Students on external campuses will coordinate these steps with the external campus executive director/dean.

  1. Advanced Standing Examination form may be obtained in the office of the registrar. 
  2. Fill out the form obtaining information from the dean of the academic school. 
  3. Pay the 1/3 tuition based on campus of record for the course in the business office.
  4. Return the form with receipt showing payment to the office of the registrar.
  5. Schedule an appointment for test administration with the dean of the academic school.
  6. After completion of the examination, the dean will report a grade to the office of the registrar. Credit is granted only if the student scores 80 or above on the examination. The student will receive as a course grade the letter equivalency of the test grade.

If the student fails the examination, he/she must enroll in the course and pay regular tuition and fees. Advanced standing examinations are not available for a course in which the student has previously received a GPA grade of F. Work completed at universities or colleges that are designated as testing schools will be evaluated using the standards of the advanced standing examination.

Transfer Credit

The University will consider for transfer collegiate-level work completed at an institution of higher education. To be acceptable for transfer, the work must be of comparable level and content with the degree being sought at Wayland. In no instance will remedial, high school, or duplicate work be accepted for transfer. Acceptability of work for transfer does not imply that it is applicable toward the requirements of a particular degree program. It is the responsibility of the student to provide official transcripts of all college work completed as of the date of the application. Failure to list all colleges attended is considered grounds for denial of admission into Wayland as well as possible immediate suspension for those currently enrolled at Wayland.

The student must provide official copies of transcripts from each institution attended. The records facility of the granting institution must send such transcripts directly to the University Registrar’s office. Students registering at one of the university’s external campuses may have the transcript sent to the external campus executive director/dean. The executive director/ campus dean will then forward the transcript to the Office of the University Registrar. A hand-carried document will be accepted for evaluation if it is in a sealed institution envelope with a school seal, stamp, or signature on the back flap of the envelope. Upon receipt, the documents become the property of Wayland and will not be returned to the student either as originals or as copies. The university’s transcript evaluators are responsible for the evaluation of transfer credit. For courses not previously assessed, a syllabus and course outcomes may be required and reviewed by the school dean for which that course would be considered equivalent to Wayland work. The university’s academic council will hear appeals of decisions made by these evaluators and the judgment of this council is final.

All transferred work (with accompanying grades or marks) will be translated into Wayland terms. At the undergraduate level, when the content or level renders an equivalency impossible, the work will be given a generic title and number. Under no circumstance will work taken at the freshman or sophomore level count toward satisfying the upper-level requirements established for any degree. Work completed at universities or colleges that are designated as testing schools will be evaluated using the standards established under the advanced standing examination portion of the catalog.

Transfer work will become a part of the student’s record only after matriculation (defined as enrollment continued after census date) and then only when the student has established a course of record. Transfer credit will be assessed and students will be informed of the amount of credit which will transfer, preferably prior to their enrollment, but at least prior to the end of the first academic term in which they are enrolled or permitted. A total of six hours of D grades may be accepted in transfer. No courses with a grade of D will be accepted from an institution at which the student has a GPA of less than a 2.0. A grade of D will not be accepted as transfer for any English course used to fulfill a university or degree specific general education core requirement. A grade of D will not be accepted as transfer into a student’s major, minor or specialization.

Transfer Credit Equivalencies

For purposes of transfer, work taken on a trimester system will be converted to semester hours on a one-to-one basis. If the work was taken on a class hour basis, 15 class hours will be equated to one semester hour. For conversion from quarter hours to semester hours, the following equivalencies have been established:

quarter hours   semester hours quarter hours   semester hours
1 = .66 4 = 2.66
2 = 1.33 5 = 3.33
3 = 2.0 6 = 4.0

The university will use the summation of the individual course equivalencies from a particular institution to compute GPA and/or credits earned. For credit systems other than those listed above, the university registrar will determine an appropriate mathematical relationship
and apply it to the record in question.

Foreign Institutions

Students who wish to transfer work from foreign institutions must submit the following:

  1. Official transcript(s) in the original language sent directly from the issuing institution to the Office of the University Registrar.
  2. Translations of the official transcript(s) into standard English and certified by a translator approved by the university registrar. 
  3. Evaluation of the official transcript must be done by a professional evaluator service.

    This evaluation must include appropriate subject identification, upper/lower level designation, and U.S. equivalent GPA calculation. A copy of the results for each transcript must be sent directly to Wayland from the evaluation service. A list of acceptable companies is available from the university registrar or the international admissions representative. The preferred agency is World Education Services, Inc. (WES). WES may be contacted at:

World Education Services, Inc.
P.O. Box 5087
Bowling Green Station
New York, NY 10274-5087
Email: info@wes.org
Web Site: www.wes.org

Non-Collegiate Experience

Military Credit

Persons who are currently serving in the military or those who have been granted honorable or general discharge from military service of the United States may request a review of service records for assessment for potential credit for the B.A.S. or B.C.M.
degrees. The student must provide certified copies of the DD214 or other applicable documents. American Council on Education (ACE) guidelines will be used in the evaluation process.

Other

Credit for non-collegiate experience is awarded only in areas offered within the current curriculum of the university and appropriate to the student’s educational program (i.e., B.A.S., B.C.M., and A.A.S. degrees). It is awarded to matriculated (defined as enrollment after census date) students only. Decisions regarding the awarding and determination of such credit will be made by qualified faculty at the university according to procedures and standards approved by the university’s academic council. These procedures and standards are available in the B.A.S./B.C.M. records office. Credit may be awarded only when there is documentation, which demonstrates achievement equivalent to outcomes specified for courses in the student’s degree program. Credit awards must be supported by documentation indicating the procedure utilized to evaluate the learning and the basis on which the credit was awarded. Credit for non-collegiate work may not duplicate credit previously awarded.

Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC)

Wayland Baptist University is a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium and the SOC Degree Network System (DNS).

Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium

Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC), established in 1972, is a consortium of national higher education associations and more than 1,900 institutional members. SOC Consortium institutional members subscribe to principles and criteria to ensure that quality academic programs are available to military students, their family members, civilian employees of the Department of Defense (DoD), Coast Guard, and veterans. A list of current SOC Consortium member institutions can be found on the SOC Web site at http://www.soc.aascu.org/.

SOC Degree Network System

The SOC Degree Network System (DNS) consists of a subset of SOC Consortium member institutions selected by the military services to deliver specific Associate and Bachelor’s degree programs to servicemembers and their families. Institutional members of the SOC DNS agree to special requirements and obligations that provide military students, their spouses and college-age children with opportunities to complete college degrees without suffering loss of academic credit due to changes of duty station.

SOC operates the 2- and 4-year Degree Network System for the Army (SOCAD), Navy (SOCNAV), Marine Corps (SOCMAR), and Coast Guard (SOCCOAST). Refer to the SOC Degree Network System-2 and -4 Handbooks to view Associate and Bachelor’s degree programs, location offerings, and college information. An electronic version of the Handbook is posted on the SOC Web site, http://www.soc.aascu.org, on the SOCAD, SOCNAV, SOCMAR, and SOCCOAST home pages.

Correspondence and Extension Credit

Although Wayland does not offer either correspondence or extension courses, the university may allow a maximum of 12 semester hours (six in the major) of such credit to be transferred from another institution. For a course to transfer, a minimum grade of C is required. Students may not transfer a course by correspondence in which a D or an F has already been earned in residence.

International and American Study Opportunities

Wayland Baptist University participates in the bestsemester.com program. CCCU’s bestsemester.com offers students an opportunity to experience the real world and share their faith in either an international or national environment. The Culture Shaping program focuses on participating in the American Studies Program, Contemporary Music Center, Washington Journalism Center, and the Los Angeles Film Studies Center. The Culture Crossing program has an international focus with China Studies Program, Latin American Studies, Middle East Studies, the Scholars’ Semester in Oxford, Russian Studies, Oxford Summer, Australia Studies Centre, and Uganda Studies.

Credit is available for participation in these programs. Students interested in participating in bestsemester.com should contact the registrars office for more information. Federal financial aid is available for students doing study-abroad programs and should contact the Financial Aid office for more information.

Culture-Shaping Programs

The following program descriptions are from bestsemester. com. For more information visit their website at www.bestsemester.com.

The American Studies Program (ASP)

Washington, D.C., is a stimulating educational laboratory for the ASP. Participants explore pressing national and international issues through enrollment in either the Public Policy Initiatives track or Global Humanitarian Enterprise track, which combine seminars led by ASP faculty and Washington professionals with student projects. The internship (20-30 hours per week) is essential to the ASP experience. Students live in the Dellenback Center in the Capital Hill neighborhood. [Students can earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

The Contemporary Music Center (CMC)

The Contemporary Music Center (CMC) provides students with the opportunity to live and work in the refining context of community while seeking to understand how God will have them integrate music, faith and business. The CMC offers three tracks: the Artist, Executive and Technical Tracks. The Artist Track is tailored to students considering careers as vocalists, musicians, songwriters, recording artists, performers and producers. The Executive Track is designed for business, arts management, marketing, communications and related majors interested in possible careers as artist managers, agents, record company executives, music publishers, concert promoters and entertainment industry entrepreneurs. The Technical Track prepares students for careers in live sound, concert lighting and studio recording. Students within each of the tracks receive instruction, experience and a uniquely Christ-centered perspective on creativity and the marketplace, while working together to create and market a recording of original music. Each track includes coursework, labs, directed study and a practicum. [Students earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

The Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC)

The Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC) is designed to train students to serve in various aspects of the film industry with both professional skill and Christian integrity. Each semester, students live, learn, and work in L.A. The curriculum consists of two required seminars, Hollywood Production Workshop and Theology in Hollywood, focusing on the role of film in culture and the relationship of faith to work in this very influential industry. In addition, students choose one elective course from a variety of offerings in film studies. Internships in various segments of the film industry provide students with hands-on experience. The combination of the internship and seminars allows students to explore the film industry within a Christian context and from a liberal arts perspective. [Students earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

The Washington Journalism Center (WJC)

The Washington Journalism Center (WJC) is a semester-long study program in Washington, DC, created for students interested in the field of journalism. While in Washington students will take classes focusing on the history and future of the media and how it relates to the public as well as to their personal writing skills. These classes - Foundations for Media Involvement; Reporting in Washington; and Washington, News and Public Discourse - combined with an internship at a top news publication will help students learn to integrate their faith in a journalism career. Students will stay in the Dellenback Center (along with students from the American Studies Program) and will participate in several service learning opportunities within the DC community. [Students earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

Culture-Crossing Programs

The following program descriptions are from bestsemester. com. For more information visit their website at www.bestsemester.com.

The Australian Studies Centre (ASC)

The Australian Studies Centre (ASC) is a cultural studies program with an arts focus, based in Sydney, Australia. The program is run by the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU), an international association of intentionally Christian colleges and universities. Designed to provide undergraduates of all majors and career interests with the opportunity to study the arts and theology in Sydney, the program also emphasizes Indigenous studies and faithful, global involvement.

Cultural Interaction is a large factor of the ASC semester. Students participate in service projects and live in homestays with local families to help them encounter the Australia that tourists never see. From art and ministry to drama and dance, students attending ASC have every opportunity to pursue their passions and interests with other Christians from around North America and the world even as they compare and contrast the Australia of myths and movies with the realities of everyday life. Throughout the semester, ASC students engage the history of Australia’s Indigenous peoples and discover their modern identities and present realities. [ASC students receive 16 semester hours of credit.]

The China Studies Program (CSP)

The China Studies Program (CSP) enables students to engage this ancient and intriguing country from the inside. While living in and experiencing Chinese civilization firsthand, students participate in seminar courses on the historical, cultural, religious, geographic and economic realities of this strategic and populous nation. In addition to the study of standard Chinese language, students are given opportunities such as assisting Chinese students learning English or helping in an orphanage, allowing for one-on-one interaction. Students choose between completing a broad Chinese Studies concentration or a Business Concentration that includes a three-week, full-time internship. The program introduces students to the diversity of China, including Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’an, Xiamen and Hong Kong. This interdisciplinary, cross cultural program enables students to deal with this increasingly important part of the world in an informed, Christ-centered way. [Students earn 16-17 semester hours of credit.]

India Studies Program (ISP)

India Studies Program (ISP) is structured to provide students with both immersion in a local community and broad exposure to a variety of peoples, places and customs in India including an extensive two-week travel portion of the program to provide students a close up look at India’s diversity. Students will participate in two core courses designed to provide a broad overview of the historical, religious, geographical and economic landscape of India. Building on their basic understanding of India’s past and contemporary realities, students will have opportunities to explore a variety of issues - poverty, social justice, rapid social change, religious pluralism - through the eyes and experience of Indian Christians. Rounding out the semester experience, students will also have the opportunity to take courses in their major areas with Indian students and professors. [Students earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

The Latin American Studies Program (LASP)

The Latin American Studies Program (LASP) introduces students to a wide range of experiences through the study of the language, literature, culture, politics, history, economics, ecology and religion of the region. Living with a Costa Rican family, students experience and become a part of the day-to-day lives of Latin Americans. Students also take part in an internship/practicum and travel to nearby Central American nations. Students participate in one of four concentrations: Latin American Studies (offered both fall and spring terms); Advanced Language and Literature (designed for Spanish majors and offered both fall and spring terms); International Business (offered only in fall terms); and Environmental Science (offered only during spring terms). [Students in all concentrations earn 16-18 semester credits.]

The Middle East Studies Program (MESP)

The Middle East Studies Program (MESP), based in Cairo, Egypt, allows Council students to explore and interact with the complex and strategic world of the modern Middle East. The interdisciplinary seminars give students the opportunity to explore the diverse religious, social, cultural and political traditions of Middle Eastern peoples. Students also study the Arabic language and work as volunteers with various organizations in Cairo. Through travel to Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan, Syria and Turkey, students are exposed to the diversity and dynamism of the region. At a time of tension and change in the Middle East, MESP encourages and equips students to relate to the Muslim world in an informed, constructive and Christ centered manner. [Students earn 16 semester hours of credit.]

Programmes in Oxford

The Scholars’ Semester in Oxford (SSO)

The Scholars’ Semester in Oxford (SSO) is designed for students interested in doing intensive scholarship in this historic seat of learning. Working with academic tutors, students hone their skills and delve into the areas that interest them most. As Visiting Students of Oxford University and members of Wycliffe Hall, students have the privilege to study and learn in one of university’s historic halls. SSO students enroll in a Primary and Secondary Tutorial, an Integrative Seminar and the course Christianity and Cultures. The SSO is designed for students interested in the fields of Classics, English & Literature, Theology & Religious Studies, Philosophy, and History, though all majors may apply. Applicants are generally honors and other very high-achieving students. [Students earn 17 semester hours of credit.]

The Oxford Summer Programme (OSP)

The Oxford Summer Programme (OSP) is a program designed for students wishing to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between Christianity and the development of the British Isles and give more focused attention to topics of particular interest through the seminars which emphasize student learning and research under expert guidance. Seminars (and their attached tutorials) are given on specialized topics under the direction of expert Oxford academics in the areas of history, religious studies, philosophy, English literature, the history of art, and history of science. The programme is structured for rising college sophomores, juniors, and seniors, graduate and seminary students, non-traditional students, teachers, and those enrolled in continuing education programs. [Students earn 6 semester hours of credit.]

Uganda Studies Program (USP)

Uganda Studies Program (USP) provides students with immersion in a local community and broad exposure to a variety of people and places in Uganda and neighboring Rwanda. Students in the Uganda Studies Emphasis (USE) live on campus at Uganda Christian University in Mukano, Uganda, sharing their lives with university students from Uganda and other nations in Africa. Students in the intercultural Ministry and Missions Emphasis (IMME) live with host families within walking distance of the university, experiencing life as a Ugandan family member. All USP students take classes from UCU professors and share their meals with UCU students. USP students will not leave Uganda without being exposed to and engaged in the realities of African life. [In addition to the core experiential course, students will choose from an approved selection of courses from the UCU Honours College to earn up to 16 hours of credit.]

Classification of Degree-Seeking Students

A degree-seeking undergraduate student is classified as a freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior according to the number of semester hours of course work earned toward the degree. Students are classified as follows:

Classification Semester Credit Hours Earned
Freshman 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90 and above

Class Attendance - Plainview Campus

The university expects students to make class attendance a priority. Faculty members provide students a copy of attendance requirements. These are provided on the first day of class.

Students in programs for which an outside agency (such as the Veteran’s Administration) has stricter attendance requirements will be subject to those requirements. In addition, the university registrar will provide each student affected a list of these regulations.

The dean of the school must approve part-time and adjunct faculty class attendance requirements prior to syllabi distribution.

Class Attendance - External Campuses

Students enrolled at one of the university’s external campuses should make every effort to attend all class meetings. All absences must be explained to the instructor, who will then determine whether the omitted work may be made up. When a student reaches that number of absences considered by the instructor to be excessive, the instructor will so advise the student and file an unsatisfactory progress report with the external campus executive director/dean. Any student who misses 25 percent or more of the regularly scheduled class meetings may receive a grade of F in the course. Additional attendance policies for each course, as defined by the instructor in the course syllabus, are considered a part of the university’s attendance policy. A student may petition the Academic Council for exceptions to the above stated policies by filing a written request for an appeal to the executive vice president/provost.

Class Attendance - Online

Students are expected to participate in all required instructional activities in their courses. Online courses are no different in this regard; however, participation must be defined in a different manner. Student “attendance” in an online course is defined as active participation in the course as described in the course syllabus. Instructors in online courses are responsible for providing students with clear instructions for how they are required to participate in the course. Additionally, instructors are responsible for incorporating specific instructional activities within their course and will, at a minimum, have weekly mechanisms for documenting student participation. These mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, participating in a weekly discussion board, submitting/completing assignments in Blackboard, or communicating with the instructor. Students aware of necessary absences must inform the professor with as much advance notice as possible in order to make appropriate arrangements. Any student absent 25 percent or more of the online course, i.e., non-participatory during 3 or more weeks of an 11 week term, may receive an F for that course. Instructors may also file a Report of Unsatisfactory Progress for students with excessive non-participation. Any student who has not actively participated in an online class prior to the census date for any given term is considered a “no-show” and will be administratively withdrawn from the class without record. To be counted as actively participating, it is not sufficient to log in and view the course. The student must be submitting work as described in the course syllabus. Additional attendance and participation policies for each course, as defined by the instructor in the course syllabus, are considered a part of the university’s attendance policy.

Academic Honesty

University students are expected to conduct themselves according to the highest standards of academic honesty. Academic misconduct for which a student is subject to penalty includes all forms of cheating, such as illicit possession of examinations or examination materials, forgery, or plagiarism. (Plagiarism is the presentation of the work of another as one’s own work.)

Disciplinary action for academic misconduct is the responsibility of the faculty member assigned to the course. The faculty member is charged with assessing the gravity of any case of academic dishonesty and with giving sanctions to any student involved. Penalties that may be applied to individual cases of academic dishonesty include one or more of the following:

  1. Written reprimand. 
  2. Requirement to redo work in question.
  3. Requirement to submit additional work.
  4. Lowering of grade on work in question.
  5. Assigning the grade of F to work in question.
  6. Assigning the grade of F for course.
  7. Recommendation for more severe punishment (see Student Handbook for further information).

The faculty member involved will file a record of the offense and the punishment imposed with the school dean, external campus executive director/dean, and the executive vice president/ provost. The executive vice president/provost will maintain records of all cases of academic dishonesty reported for not more than two years.

Any student who has been penalized for academic dishonesty has the right to appeal the judgment or the penalty assessed. The appeals procedure will be the same as that specified for student grade appeals. (See Student Handbook for further information or, for external students, the external campus executive director/dean).

Course Syllabus

A course syllabus will be provided to each student on the first day of class. At a minimum, each Wayland undergraduate syllabus is to include the following elements in the order listed: 

  1. Wayland Baptist University, campus name, academic school name (e.g., School of Languages and Literature) 
  2. Wayland Mission Statement
  3. Course Name - alpha, numeric, section, course title (e.g., ENGL 1301 - Composition and Rhetoric )
  4. Term 
  5. First and last name of instructor 
  6. Office phone and email (home phone and cell phone optional) 
  7. Office hours, building, and location 
  8. Class meeting time and location 
  9. Catalog description
  10. Prerequisites 
  11. Required textbook and resource materials
  12. Optional materials
  13. Course outcome competencies
  14. Attendance requirements
  15. Disability statement - In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), it is the policy of Wayland Baptist University that no otherwise qualified person with a disability be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any educational program or activity in the university. The Coordinator of Counseling Services serves as the coordinator of students with a disability and should be contacted concerning accommodation requests at (806) 291-3765. Documentation of a disability must accompany any request for accommodations.
  16. Course requirements and grading criteria 
  17. Tentative schedule (calendar, topics, assignments)
  18. Faculty may add additional information as desired

Classroom Disruption

Students who disrupt a class will be directed to leave immediately and report to the external campus executive director/dean or dean of students, who will discuss with the student the cause of the disruption. The student will return to the class only with permission of the executive director/campus dean or dean of students and faculty member involved.

Auditing a Course

Students may attend classes for a course without receiving credit if they complete an application for admission, submit a registration form requesting audit at the time of registration, and have the permission of both the instructor of the course and the dean of the school in which the course is offered. The cost is one-third tuition in addition to all course fees. No credit is awarded and no record of the student’s attendance is maintained. Students will not be given permission to audit a course until the first day of classes. Audits are on a space-available basis and no refund will be given if the course is dropped. A credit may only be changed from credit to audit before the census date of the term. Under no circumstance may an audit be converted to credit.

Wayland Gold Card

The Wayland Gold Card program is designed to offer opportunities to members of the community for continuing education, social interaction, auditing classes and community involvement throughout the region. An application and eligibility criterion is available through the Office of Advancement on the Plainview campus at 1900 W. 7th, CMB #1295, Plainview, TX 79072.

Plainview Undergraduates Enrolled in Wayland Internet Courses

Plainview students are allowed to register for online courses in the last week of Virtual Campus registration.

Undergraduates Enrolled in Graduate Courses

A Wayland student classified as a senior in the last regular or summer session term of undergraduate work may enroll in up to six semester hours of graduate work, provided that the student has completed an application to the Graduate Program, has a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, and has obtained written approval from the dean of the school in which the work is offered. With approval from the academic advisor, the student may apply credit for graduate course work to either the undergraduate degree or graduate degree during the semester taken; however, in no instance may credit for course work be applied to both degrees. On external campuses, the advisor must notify the correct administrative office in writing as to the area for which credit is to be applied.

If the graduate course work is to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements, the student shall be governed by the existing catalog of record. If the graduate course work is to be applied to Wayland graduate degree requirements, the student shall be governed by the current catalog at the time of initial enrollment in graduate course work. Students will not be allowed to enroll in any more graduate classes until admitted to the university as a graduate student and the baccalaureate degree has been posted. Courses taken to be used toward a graduate program may have financial aid implications. For clarification of financial aid, contact the campus financial aid representative.

Schedule Changes

A course may be added to or dropped from a student’s schedule during the time specified in the official university calendar. For Plainview students, schedule changes must be approved by the university registrar or the executive vice president/provost, the student’s advisor, coach if applicable, and the instructor concerned. For students at external campuses, schedule changes must be approved by the external campus executive director/dean. Other regulations related to adding or dropping a course follow:

Adding a Course

To add a course at the Plainview campus, a student must obtain an ADD/DROP form from the university registrar’s office. This form must be signed by the student’s advisor, coach if applicable, and the course’s instructor. Students at external campuses must obtain an ADD/DROP form from the external campus executive director/dean. This change must be approved by the executive director/campus dean. If these are not available, the form may be signed by the executive vice president/provost. There is no charge for adding a course. Under no circumstance may a course be added after the date indicated in the official calendar for adding a course.

Dropping a Course

To drop a course at the Plainview campus, a student must obtain an ADD/DROP form from the university registrar’s office. This form must be signed by the student’s advisor, coach if applicable, and the course’s instructor. Students at external campuses must obtain an ADD/DROP form from the external executive director/campus dean. This change must be approved by the executive director/campus dean. If these are not available, the form may be signed by the executive vice president/provost. There is no charge for courses dropped as a result of changes in the university’s course schedule, the request of the student’s advisor, or during the official registration period. Otherwise, a fee of $10 will be charged for each course dropped. A student may drop a course without record through the date in the official calendar indicated as the census date for Withdrawal Without a Letter Grade. For courses dropped after the last day to receive a W, the student will receive either WP or WF indicating withdrawal passing or withdrawal failing. Students may not drop courses or withdraw from the University after the last day for WP and WF as indicated in the university calendar; students will receive the grade earned in the class. Students placed in Academic Achievement courses may not drop these courses without consent of the director of academic achievement. A student is officially dropped from a course only after the ADD/DROP form has been received and dated in the university registrar’s office. Failure to file the ADD/DROP form can result in grades of F in courses affected. Dropping a course can affect financial aid. Students should contact the campus financial aid representative for award details. Any student who drops a course according to the procedures stipulated will be allowed a grace period of two working days to rescind the drop.

Repetition of a Course

If a Wayland course is repeated, the initial grade received in the course will remain on the transcript, but only the last grade will be used to calculate the Wayland cumulative GPA. All repeated grades are indicated as such on the official record. When a course has been taken more than twice at Wayland, all grades will remain on the transcript, and the last grade will be used to calculate the Wayland cumulative GPA. For courses repeated at other universities to replace a failing grade received at Wayland, the WBU GPA will not reflect the repeated grade.

Once students have been awarded a degree by the university, they may not repeat a course as a part of that degree for the purpose of changing the grade or GPA on the official transcript. However, courses may be repeated in order to qualify for post-baccalaureate programs or to enter graduate school.

A course may be repeated for multiple credits toward graduation only when so designated in the catalog course description and approved by the faculty advisor. In cases where this regulation is violated, only the last effort will be calculated into the GPA and all other attempts will be recorded as “no credit” or the equivalent.

Withdrawal from the University

Withdrawing from the university is defined as “dropping all courses in which the student is currently enrolled.” Failure to file an official request may result in grades of F for courses in progress. A student who withdraws from the university according to the procedures stipulated will be allowed a grace period of two working days to rescind the withdrawal. The university calendar notes last dates to withdraw. Final examination days and days thereafter are specifically excluded.

Students enrolled at the Plainview campus must file a Withdrawal Card with the university registrar’s office by the last day to withdraw as indicated in the university calendar. The Withdrawal Card must be approved by the dean of students, dorm counselor/housing director, librarian, university store, financial aid, director of student accounts, executive vice president/ provost, vice president for enrollment management and the university registrar.

Students enrolled at the external campuses must file an ADD/DROP Request form which must be signed by the external campus executive director/dean.

Withdrawal Cards and/or ADD/DROP Request forms, duly signed, must be submitted to the university registrar. To receive a transcript, all accounts in the Business Office must be paid.

Administrative Withdrawal from the University

Any student who has not attended class according to university records by the census date for any given term is considered a “no show” and will be administratively withdrawn from the class or university without record. The student is advised that this action may have adverse effects on financial aid.

Academic Probation and Suspension

Students are placed on academic restriction when their cumulative GPA falls below a designated level. Restriction is based on terms 10 weeks or longer in length. A student may have restrictions moved based on performance during shorter terms. Any term with mixed beginning and ending dates may be exempt from academic restriction. Types of academic restrictions and the conditions attached to each follow:

Academic Probation

This academic restriction applies to those students who:

  1. Have attempted from 30 to 59 semester hours with a GPA lower than 1.60; or
  2. Have earned 60 or more semester hours with a GPA lower than 2.0, or
  3. Are enrolled on a part-time basis and fail to complete enrolled hours during a regular term.

Academic Suspension

This academic restriction applies to those students who:

  1. Have attempted from 30 to 59 semester hours and who have a GPA lower than 1.60 after one semester on Academic Probation; or
  2. Have attempted 60 or more semester hours and who have a GPA lower than 2.0 after one semester on Academic Probation; or
  3. Are enrolled on a part-time basis and failed to complete enrolled hours after one semester on Academic Probation; or 
  4. Full-time students must pass at least three hours to remain in good standing. Students who pass fewer than the required number of semester hours will be placed on Academic Suspension. Students do not have to be on a previous Academic Probation to be suspended under this criteria.

Students placed on academic suspension are suspended immediately. This suspension continues through the next regular semester for first-time suspensions, and for a full calendar year for any subsequent suspensions. Following the suspension, students are required to reapply for admission. Any student who has been on suspension and has re-applied for admission, must be accepted and permitted to the university prior to enrolling in classes. Students reinstated to the university will be on academic probation and while on probation must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 to remain in the university.

Student Grade Appeals

A basic aspect of the teaching-learning process is the evaluation of student performances and the assignment of grades. Student performance is evaluated solely on an academic basis, and not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to the course taken.

Faculty are responsible for providing syllabi which clearly specify course objectives and/ or competencies, and for making clear the means of evaluation for purposes of grading students. Students are responsible for class attendance, for learning the content of any course of study and for those standards of academic performance established for a given course. Students who violate academic integrity and regulations by plagiarism, classroom misdemeanor, or academic dishonesty will be held accountable to faculty and may have their grades adjusted accordingly.

Students shall have protection through orderly procedures against prejudices or capricious academic evaluation. A student, who believes that he or she has not been held to realistic academic standards, just evaluation procedures, or appropriate grading, may appeal the final grade given in the course by using the following grievance and appeal procedures. Appeals are limited to the final course grade. Appeals may not be made for advanced placement examinations or course bypass examinations.

Online Degree Program and Virtual Campus Students

Any students pursuing degrees through Wayland’s on-line programs will follow the appeal process outlined for the Plainview campus. If the student is associated with one of the external campuses, the student will follow the process outlined for external campus students. The process may end at any step if the grievance is resolved or if a party fails to follow the above procedures.

Plainview Campus, Virtual Campus (Plainview primary campus), School of Nursing students

If the student feels the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at the student-faculty level, students should follow these steps:

  1. The student shall first present, in writing, the matter of grievance to the instructor of the course. This must be done within thirty days after the beginning of the next regular semester. If agreement is reached, the faculty member will either sustain the judgment made or make a change according to the agreement reached within two weeks.
  2. If the student feels the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at the student-faculty level, the student should submit the grievance to the dean of the school in which the course is taught. The appeal must be made in writing within two weeks after the faculty member has acted on the grievance; otherwise, the grievance shall be considered withdrawn. The dean of the school will review all facts and evidence in the case and mediate a decision within two weeks after the receipt of the grievance. If the grievance is not further appealed, it will be considered resolved.
  3. If the student is not satisfied, he/she may request the executive vice president/provost to refer the appeal to the university Faculty Assembly Grade Appeals Committee. This request must be made in writing, must include the basis for the appeal, and must be submitted within two weeks following receipt of the decision of the dean of the school.
  4. The student or faculty member may appeal the findings of the committee in writing to the executive vice president/provost within one week after receiving the committee’s report. The executive vice president/provost will render a decision within two weeks and copies of such decision will be sent to the student, the faculty member, and the dean of the school involved. This decision shall be final in all cases of grade appeals.
  5. Failure to submit grievances within the required time period will negate the student’s complaint. No grievances will be considered after one full term has passed after the student has received the grade in question.

External Campus and Virtual Campus (associated with an external campus) Students

If a student feels the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at the student-faculty level, the student should follow the steps below: 

  1. A student shall first present, in writing, the matter of grievance to the instructor of the course. This must be done within thirty days after the beginning of the next regular term. If agreement is reached, the faculty member will either sustain the judgment made or make a change according to the agreement reached within two weeks.
  2. If the student feels the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at the student-faculty level, the external campus student should submit the grievance to the campus executive director within two weeks after the decision by the professor. The external campus executive director will either sustain the judgment of the professor or make a change according to the agreement reached with the student within two weeks. The executive director will notify the appropriate school dean of this decision. 
  3. If the student feels the matter is not satisfactorily resolved at student-executive director level, the grievance should be submitted to the dean of the school in which the course is taught. The appeal must be made in writing within two weeks after the faculty member or external campus executive director has acted on the grievance; otherwise, the grievance shall be considered withdrawn. The dean of the school will review all facts and evidence in the case and mediate a decision within two weeks after the receipt of the grievance. If the grievance is not further appealed, it will be considered resolved.
  4. If the student is not satisfied, he/she may request the executive vice president/provost to refer the appeal to the university Faculty Assembly Grade Appeals Committee. This request must be made in writing, must include the basis for the appeal, and must be submitted within two weeks following receipt of the decision of the dean of the school.
  5. The student or faculty member may appeal the findings of the committee in writing to the executive vice president/provost within one week after receiving the committee’s report. The executive vice president/provost will render a decision within two weeks and copies of such decision will be sent to the student, the faculty member, the external campus executive director, and the dean of the school involved. This decision shall be final in all cases of grade appeals. 
  6. Failure to submit grievances within the required time period will negate the student’s complaint.

For students attending a campus in the state of Arizona, if the appeal cannot be resolved after exhausting the appeal process, the student may file a complaint with the Arizona State Board of Private Post-Secondary Education. The student must contact the State Board for further details. The State Board address is: 1400 W. Washington, Room 260, Phoenix, AZ 85007. Phone: (602) 542-5709; Website: http://www.ppse.az.gov.

Minimum Academic Standards for Students Receiving VA Educational Benefits

Students who fail to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.00 shall be placed on probation for one term. Students who achieve a term GPA of 2.00 or better during the probationary period, but do not achieve the required 2.00 cumulative GPA, may continue on probation for one more term. Students who fail to achieve a 2.00 GPA at the end of the first probationary period shall be reported to the Veteran’s Administration Regional Office (VARO) as making unsatisfactory progress. Students who fail to achieve a 2.00 cumulative GPA at the end of the second consecutive probationary period shall be reported to the VARO as making unsatisfactory progress and may become ineligible to receive further VA benefits until the cumulative GPA is 2.00 or better.

Transcript Release Policy

Academic transcripts are issued only for those students who have met admissions requirements for the appropriate admissions category or degree program. Transfer work will become a part of the student’s record only after matriculation (defined as enrollment through census date), and then only when the student has established a satisfactory course of record, which includes a minimum of one academic course. UNIV 1100  and UNIV 1101  are not constituted as academic courses. All Business Office accounts must be paid in full and all admission holds cleared before a transcript may be released. (See Payment of Account under the tuition and fees section) 

Graduation Requirements

Requirements to receive a baccalaureate degree from Wayland include:

  1. Completion of UNIV 1100  or UNIV 1101 , Foundation of University Life or equivalent. See course description.
  2. A minimum of 124 semester hours for baccalaureate degrees. No more than four semester hours of music ensemble credits may be included in the 124 semester hours for degrees other than B.A.S. or B.C.M.
  3. A minimum of 31 semester hours completed in residence to earn a degree at Wayland with the exception of the B.M. and B.S.N. degrees which require a minimum of 35 hours and 34 hours respectively. For the A.A. at least 15 hours must be completed in residence. A minimum of 18 hours must be completed in residence for the A.A.S. degree. Less than 50% of the required courses applied toward a degree may be taken through distance learning which includes internet and ITV delivery methods, with the exception of the B.A.S.
  4. Except for the B.A.S., B.C.M., degrees, a minimum of 15 semester hours in the major and six semester hours in the minor must be completed at Wayland. 
  5. A minimum GPA of 2.0 (C) on a 4-point scale on all Wayland course work and a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the major and minor fields of study. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 from all course work applied to the degree. 
  6. A minimum of 42 semester hours of upper-level credit (courses numbered 3000 and above) for the degrees B.A., B.B.A., B.F.A., B.M., B.S., B.S.I.S., and B.S.N. A minimum of 36 semester hours of upper-level credit for the B.A.S., B.C.M. degrees.
  7. Completion of the university’s general education core requirements. 
  8. A minimum of 30 semester hours in the major field of study, 15 of which must be upper-level courses. For those degrees which include a composite major, the number of semester hours and number of upper-level credits are indicated in that section of the catalog which describes the composite major. 
  9. A minimum of 18 semester hours in the minor of which six must be upper-level courses. For those degrees which include a broad field major, no minor is required.
  10. Completion of GRAD 0001 Senior Seminar . See course descriptions. (Students who are student teaching must take GRAD 0001  the term prior to student teaching.) 
  11. Completion of application for graduation for appropriate degree.
  12. A comprehensive examination in the major field.

Application for Graduation

Students intending to have a degree conferred at the next regular graduation period must enroll in GRAD 0001 Senior Seminar , see course description, and must notify the university registrar and their advisor at the time of registration for the term prior to that graduation. Students on external campuses must notify the campus executive director/dean and advisor. Students who plan to participate in the Plainview campus graduation ceremony must submit the Application for Degree and pay the graduation fee no later than the date indicated in the university calendar (April/May graduation: February 15, August graduation: June 15, December graduation: September 15).

Degree candidates attending one of the university’s external campuses must file the Application for Graduation and pay a fee a minimum of 12 weeks prior to graduation. Graduation applications received after the deadline will be processed with applications for the next graduation. For a Plainview student to be eligible for graduation, all his/her transcripts supporting transfer credit from other institutions must have been received by the registrar and all incompletes must be removed by the application deadline. On external campuses, transfer and assessed credit is due and all incompletes must be removed six weeks prior to posting date.

All students are required to purchase a cap and gown. It is automatically calculated in the application fee. Application for graduation and the graduation fee are not transferable to a subsequent semester. If the student does not fulfill graduation requirements, a new application must be filed and a $50 reapplication fee paid. Financial obligations must be met in the Business Office two weeks prior to graduation. If paying after the deadline, payment must be made with guaranteed funds such as cash, money order, credit card, debit card, or cashier’s check in order to receive a transcript and diploma at time of graduation.

All requirements for degree must be completed prior to participation in a graduation ceremony.

Commencement Attendance

Candidates completing their work at Wayland Baptist University are required to attend commencement exercises. All degrees conferred will be posted to the student’s permanent record as of the official posting date. For external campus students, appeals to this policy should be made in writing to the executive director/campus dean. Plainview campus student appeals should be made in writing to the office of the registrar.

Walk-Only

For external campus graduations, students who are within one term of finishing graduation requirements may, at the discretion of the executive director/campus dean “walk-only” (without having fulfilled degree requirements) at the respective external campus graduation. Students must request in writing to the executive director/campus dean by the deadline issued by the campus for consideration to “walk-only” in a ceremony. Students are allowed to participate in a graduation ceremony only once for each degree.

For Plainview campus graduations, students must contact the office of the registrar by the application for graduation deadline for consideration to “walk-only” in the respective Plainview graduation. Students are allowed to participate in a graduation ceremony only once for each degree.

Graduation with Honors

A student graduating with the baccalaureate degree who has been in residence for at least 60 GPA semester hours, has earned a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or greater on all work taken at Wayland, and who meets the required cumulative GPA on all courses applicable to the baccalaureate degree is eligible for graduation with Latin honors. Latin honor designations include the following:

Honor Designation Required Cumulative GPA
Cum Laude (with honors) 3.50 to 3.69
Magna Cum Laude (with high honors) 3.70 to 3.89
Summa Cum Laude (with highest honors) 3.90 or above

In addition to graduating with honors, a student who has participated in the Honors Program and completed all the requirements may graduate with special honors within an area of study.

Graduation honors may be awarded to students graduating with the baccalaureate degree if at least 60 semester hours of credit with letter grades (A, B, C, etc.) from all sources have been earned, and if they have achieved a GPA of 3.50 or greater on all work taken at Wayland, and who meets the required cumulative GPA on all courses applicable to the baccalaureate degree. Honor designations include the following:

Honor Designation Required Cumulative GPA
Certificate of Honor 3.50 to 3.98
Certificate of Distinction 3.99 to 4.0

Graduation Walk-only Students and Honors Designation

Students who have been approved by the executive director/campus dean or the office of the registrar to “walk-only” during a specific campus graduation ceremony will not be awarded honors for the ceremony due to the student’s degree requirements not being completed prior to the established degree posting date. Questions concerning walk-only status should be addressed to the office of the registrar for Plainview campus graduations or the executive director/dean for external campus graduations.