Academic Catalog 2016-2017 
    
    Jun 01, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Click here to view the Texas Common Course Numbering System.

Each course includes an academic discipline prefix followed by four numerals (Example: HIST 3305). The first numeral indicates the academic level of a course; Academic Achievement is indicated by a “0”; freshman-level courses by a “1”; sophomore-level courses by a “2”; junior/senior-level courses by a “3” or “4”; courses restricted to graduate students by a “5.”

After taking a higher level course, a student is not allowed to take the prerequisite of the course for credit. For example, if a student successfully completed MATH 1304 - College Algebra, the student would not be allowed to take ACAC 0325 - Pre-Algebra and ACAC0326 - Elementary Algebra or MATH1300 - Intermediate Algebra.

The second digit indicates the semester hour credit given for the course. The third and fourth digits represent the position of the course in the sequence of offerings by the discipline.

Example: HIST 3305

  HIST - History curriculum
  3 - Junior level course
  3 - Three semester hours credit
  05 - Fifth course in the sequence of history courses

Other indicators used in the numbering system include:

  1. Career and Technology courses are indicated by CTED prefix.
  2. Hyphenated numbers, which indicate that the first semester course is usually a prerequisite to the second (GERM 1301-1302).
  3. Directed Study Courses indicated by a section number of 99 (HIST 3305.99).
  4. Practicum Courses indicated by a 60-69 in the final two digits (EDUC 4361).
  5. Experimental/Special Courses indicated by a 79X in the final digits (ENGL 4379X).
  6. Honor Courses indicated by a 90-99 in the final two digits (MATH 4691).

Not every course is offered regularly. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes to ascertain which courses are actually offered during a given semester.

***CHIN, FREN, GERM, LATN, and SPAN 1301 and CHIN, FREN, GERM, LATN, and SPAN 1302 may be taught at external campuses as three-hour courses without additional emphasis given to the communicative aspect.**

** BIOL 1300, BIOL 2301, BIOL 4307,GEOL 1301, GEOL 1304, GEOL 3302, GEOL 3304, GEOL 3305, GEOL 3309, GEOL 4307, and ENVS 3301 may be taught at external campuses as three hour courses without labs and without fees.**

Course Numbering System

Number  Eligibility
0100-0300 Developmental or Ensemble course
1000-1400 Freshman course
2000-2400 Sophomore course
3000-3400 Junior course
4000-4600 Senior course
5000-6600 Graduate course

Please note, when searching courses by Code or Number, an asterisk (*) can be used to return mass results. For instance a Code search of ” 23* ” can be entered, returning all 2300 level courses.

 

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 4407 - Oceanography


    4 hrs

    Study of ocean currents, waves, chemistry, beaches and floor, and life in the oceans with applications on how these life forms are used to trace currents, temperatures, and origins of the water. Field trips may be included as one of the instructional tools. Note: May be used in meeting biology major requirements. BIOL 4307 may be taught at external campuses as three hour courses without labs and without fees. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1401  or BIOL 1401  or school approval. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00 Also see: GEOL 4407  
  
  •  

    BIOL 4408 - Cell and Molecular Biology


    4 hrs

    Study of cellular structure and function at the molecular level; membranes, organelles, bioenergetics, nucleic acid structure and function, regulation of gene expression, the cell cycle, and the modern genetic engineering will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1401  or school approval. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    BIOL 4409 - Conservation Biology


    4 hrs

    Management of vertebrate populations emphasized through the study of environmental and other influences on population dynamics in the context of ecological communities. Field studies will be emphasized through local and regional field trips. At least one weekend field trip required. Note: Other fees may apply for field trip costs. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1402  or ENVS 3401  or school approval. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00 Also see: ENVS 4409  
  
  •  

    BIOL 4410 - Behavioral Neuroscience


    4 hrs

    Scientific investigation of processes underlying the biology of human behavior and psychological disorders including circadian rhythms, attention, cognition, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, reproduction, aging, socialization, and addictive behavior. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 3408  or BIOL 2408  or school approval. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    BIOL 5416 - Selected Topics


    4 hrs

    Topics selected from biology intended to supplement teacher education. Note: Students may repeat the course for credit upon change in content.
  
  •  

    BIOL 5420 - Problems in Biology


    4 hrs

    Research topics in biology. Note: May be taken for six hours credit.

Business Administration

  
  •  

    BUAD 2335 - Introductory Quantitative Decision Making


    3 hrs

    Develop fundamental skills in solving business-related situations involving methodologies for data identification, collection, interpretation, and presentation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1304 
  
  •  

    BUAD 3318 - Business Law


    3 hrs

    An overview of the laws regulating and affecting business including constitutional law, criminal law, property law, torts, contracts, commercial transactions, business organizations, and employment law.
  
  •  

    BUAD 4316 - Selected Topics in Business


    3 hrs

    An examination of a topic not covered by other BUAD offerings, or not covered in the same depth. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the school.
  
  •  

    BUAD 4330 - Strategic Management/Business Policy


    3 hrs

    Capstone course presents administrative processes and policy formulation from a strategic perspective via case study method and practical applications. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, business majors take during final term of Senior year.
  
  •  

    BUAD 4334 - Business Ethics


    3 hrs

    In-depth investigation of ethical management and leadership styles, including context of a Christian worldview. Ethical reasoning for application to a variety of business situations.
  
  •  

    BUAD 4335 - Quantitative Decision Making


    3 hrs

    Theoretical concepts and practical management science applications used in solving complex quantitative decision problems. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1306  or BUAD 2335 .
  
  •  

    BUAD 4360 - Practicum/Internship


    3 hrs

    (Credit/No Credit) Supervised work experience in the student’s major area in an approved position in business. Note: No substitution for required courses. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and approval of instructor and school dean.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5300 - Foundations of Management Theory and Practice


    3 hrs

    Elements of management, marketing, and management information systems. Note: Transcripts evaluated to determine requirement. Students not having courses in at least two of the areas are required to take BUAD 5300 during the first term of enrollment in the MAM or MBA degree program.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5301 - Foundations of Accounting Theory and Practice


    3 hrs

    Elements of accounting principles and accounting information systems. Note: Transcripts evaluated to determine requirement. Students not having courses in the accounting area are required to take BUAD 5301 the first or second term of enrollment in the MBA program and prior to any graduate courses having accounting as a prerequisite.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5302 - Foundations of Economic and Finance Theory and Practice


    3 hrs

    Elements of economics, finance, and quantitative methods. Note: Transcripts evaluated to determine requirement. Students not having courses in at least two of the areas are required to take BUAD 5302 during the first or second term of enrollment in the MBA program and prior to any graduate courses having economics, finance, or quantitative methods as a prerequisite.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5304 - Ethics


    3 hrs

    Systematic overview of normative ethics and comprehensive discussion of contemporary moral issues including analysis of case studies; ethical implications of employment law, diversity management and corporate sustainability.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5315 - Legal Environment


    3 hrs

    Case studies of the laws in the traditional topics of constitutional law, criminal law, property law, procedural law, international law, torts, contracts, commercial transactions, business organizations, employer and labor relations, employment law, globalization implications, and government regulations.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5355 - Strategic Management for the MBA


    3 hrs

    Management decisions with student participation in simulations and/or case studies emphasizing comprehensive organizational analysis, policy and strategy development. Note: Major Field Examination is administered. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all MBA Core Courses.
  
  •  

    BUAD 5360 - Practicum/Internship


    3 hrs

    (Credit/No Credit) Supervised practical application of previously studied theory or supervised work experience in the student’s major area in an approved position in business.

Career and Technology Education

  
  •  

    CTED 3321 - Principles of Supervision for Education and Training


    3 hrs

    Perspectives regarding supervision in the workplace; supervisory activities that meet the needs of adults; practice using techniques.
  
  •  

    CTED 4302 - Aims and Objectives of Workforce Development


    3 hrs

    Identify purposes and structures of general and vocational education; development of career and technology education in the U.S.; reinforce basic skills; organizational structure; financial support and administration; professional qualifications of instructors; current trends and legislation and its effects on the present and future programs; and concepts of SCANS, 21st Century Goals, and Tech Prep.
  
  •  

    CTED 4303 - Human Relations for Technical Instructors


    3 hrs

    Effective working relationships with students, counselors, other school personnel, persons in the community, and the industrial public; study of self concepts, personality, motives, values, sense perception, emotions, and attitudes; critical thinking and problem-solving techniques.
  
  •  

    CTED 4304 - Designing, Delivering and Managing Instruction


    3 hrs

    Instructional models and assessments that emphasize developmental characteristics and learning processes; skills to apply techniques and procedures for effective, coherent and engaging instruction.
  
  •  

    CTED 4308 - Implementing Instruction and Assessment


    3 hrs

    Implementing instruction that actively engages the learner; incorporates work-based learning principles; uses management skills to foster learning; focuses on the use of entrepreneurial , employability, and safety skills.
  
  •  

    CTED 4309 - Fulfilling Professional Roles and Responsibilities


    3 hrs

    Reviewing knowledge and skills in teacher assessment, certification, ethical and legal requirements in preparation for classroom teaching; developing professional relationships to enhance student achievement; and suggestions for developing leadership skills.
  
  •  

    CTED 4316 - The Adult Learner


    3 hrs

    Investigating principles of learning applicable to the adult learner; examining learning theories and styles related to adult learners and motivation.
  
  •  

    CTED 4333 - Statistics


    3 hrs

    Descriptive and inferential statistical concepts; techniques commonly used in research, including organization of data, graphical representation, measures of central tendency and variability, normal distribution curve, sampling theory; testing for significant differences between related and independent samples.
  
  •  

    CTED 4334 - Instructional Systems Design


    3 hrs

    Analyzing learning systems, associated learning theories, and educational and training systems techniques used in the instructional programs of industry.
  
  •  

    CTED 4360 - Internship in Trade and Industrial Instruction I


    3 hrs

    Supervision in a secondary classroom/laboratory setting in a public school; creating a portfolio of lesson plans and projects.
  
  •  

    CTED 4361 - Internship in Trade and Industrial Instruction II


    3 hrs

    Continuation of CTED 4360 . Students are enrolled in the course for one complete academic year. The student may elect to take the course as a six hour block spanning both semesters of the academic year or may enroll in CTED 4360  in the fall and CTED 4361 in the spring semester for a total of six hours.

Certificate of Christian Ministry

  
  •  

    COCM 0101 - The Pentateuch


    1 hrs

    Study of the first five books of the Old Testament with appropriate attention to the historical, literary, and theological aspects.
  
  •  

    COCM 0102 - The History of Israel and the Early Prophets


    1 hrs

    Study of Israel’s history from the occupation of Canaan to the Babylonian captivity and the prophetic warnings and hope of restoration to the Persian period.
  
  •  

    COCM 0103 - Postexilic Biblical Literature


    1 hrs

    Study of the canonical process and the biblical writing of the postexilic period including the poetic and wisdom literature.
  
  •  

    COCM 0104 - The Gospel and the Life of Christ


    1 hrs

    Study of the Intertestamental Period followed by a study of the life and ministry of Christ as presented in the four gospels, the first four books of the New Testament.
  
  •  

    COCM 0105 - Acts and the Pauline Epistles


    1 hrs

    Study of the development of the New Testament church as presented in the Book of Acts and the thirteen epistles traditionally considered to have been written by the Apostle Paul. Attention will be given to the historical, literary, and theological aspects of these books.
  
  •  

    COCM 0106 - Hebrews, the General Epistles, and Revelation


    1 hrs

    Examination of the writings that give practical guidance for Christian conduct and encouragement to Christians suffering persecution plus an introduction to apocalyptic literature and the development and transmission of the New Testament Canon.
  
  •  

    COCM 0107 - Understanding the Bible


    1 hrs

    Study of the basic principles and methods of biblical interpretation. Attention will be given to the application of these principles and methods to selected biblical passages.
  
  •  

    COCM 0108 - Basic Christian Beliefs


    1 hrs

    Introductory study of the basic doctrines of the Christian faith. Attention will be given to the great doctrines of Revelation, Scripture, God, Christ, Holy Spirit, Salvation, Church, and Christian Life.
  
  •  

    COCM 0109 - Church Administration and Policy


    1 hrs

    Study of the basic principles of church administration as they relate to the role of the pastor and other church staff members in leadership, church organization, church staff relationships, worship, and public relations.
  
  •  

    COCM 0110 - Evangelism


    1 hrs

    Study of the principles, theology, and methods of New Testament evangelism. Attention will be given to evangelism on both a personal and church level.
  
  •  

    COCM 0111 - Christian Ethics


    1 hrs

    Study of basic biblical ethics. Attention will be given to the application of biblical ethical principles in the life of the pastor and other church leaders as well as to our contemporary society and culture.
  
  •  

    COCM 0112 - Baptist History and Distinctives


    1 hrs

    Survey of Baptist history from the sixteenth century to the present, including a brief look at current denominational relationships. Attention will be given to both individuals and events that have influenced Baptist life and theology.
  
  •  

    COCM 0113 - Sharpening Relationship Skills


    1 hrs

    Study of biblical principles of leadership and their application in today’s churches and contemporary culture with a special emphasis on servant leadership. Attention also will be given to spiritual gifts and their use in ministry as well as personal discipleship and prayer.
  
  •  

    COCM 0114 - Christian Worship


    1 hrs

    Study of the nature, purpose, and methods of Christian worship. Attention will be given both to worship in the Bible and in our contemporary society.
  
  •  

    COCM 0115 - Developing a Kingdom Vision


    1 hrs

    Study of the biblical basis for a worldwide kingdom vision and how to lead a church to have such a vision. Attention will be given to past, current, and future strategies in today’s world.
  
  •  

    COCM 0116 - Pastoring a Local Church


    1 hrs

    Overview of pastoral ministry in contemporary culture. Attention will be given to the call to ministry, followed by a study of the day-to-day tasks faced by a local church pastor, including pastoral care, conducting weddings and funerals, leading church business meetings, and leading in the observance of the church ordinances.
  
  •  

    COCM 0117 - The Art of Preaching


    1 hrs

    Study of the art of preaching with attention being given to the principles and steps involved in effective sermon preparation and delivery as well as the development of a spirit-led planned program of preaching.
  
  •  

    COCM 0118 - Caring for the People of God


    1 hrs

    More in-depth study of pastoral care including crisis intervention, hospital visitation, personal counseling, and referral.
  
  •  

    COCM 0119 - Bivocational Ministry


    1 hrs

    Study of the methods, models, and challenges of bivocational pastoral ministry. Attention will be given to the unique issues faced by bivocational ministers as well as the day-to-day tasks faced by a local church pastor.
  
  •  

    COCM 0120 - The Art of Teaching


    1 hrs

    Study of the art of teaching. Attention will be given to the teaching methods of Jesus and to the principles and steps involved in effective bible teaching in today’s culture.
  
  •  

    COCM 0121 - Educational Ministry in the Local Church


    1 hrs

    Study of the biblical basis for the principles involved in, and the implementation of, an effective educational ministry in the local church.
  
  •  

    COCM 0122 - Working with Volunteers


    1 hrs

    Study of the dynamics involved in leading a group of volunteers in the educational ministry. Attention will be given to discovering, enlisting, directing, encouraging, challenging, and recognizing volunteers.
  
  •  

    COCM 0123 - Youth Ministry in the Local Church


    1 hrs

    Study of youth ministry in a local church in contemporary society. Attention will be given to the role of the youth minister as it relates to the purposes of the church, to the pastor and other church staff members, and to both the congregation and community.
  
  •  

    COCM 0124 - Relating to the Youth of Today


    1 hrs

    Study of the characteristics of today’s youth and how to work with them in order to reach them for Christ and mature them in Christ.
  
  •  

    COCM 0125 - Relating to the Families of the Youth of Today


    1 hrs

    Study of the characteristics of the families of today’s youth and how one can best relate and minister to them.
  
  •  

    COCM 0126 - Children’s Ministry in the Local Church


    1 hrs

    Study of children’s ministry in a local church in contemporary society. Attention will be given to the role of a children’s minister as it relates to the purposes of the church, to the pastor and other staff members, and to both the congregation and community.
  
  •  

    COCM 0127 - Relating to the Children of Today


    1 hrs

    Study of the characteristics of today’s children and how to work with them in order to help prepare them to receive Christ and move toward maturity in Christ.
  
  •  

    COCM 0128 - Relating to the Families of the Children of Today


    1 hrs

    Study of the characteristics of the families of today’s children and how one can best relate and minister to them.

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 1400 - Chemistry and Life


    4 hrs

    Designed for allied health students and non-science majors or minors. Emphasizes fundamentals of chemistry: chemical terminology, metric system, energy relationships, atomic structure, chemical periodicity, bonding, gases, and chemical reactions; introductory organic and biochemistry. Laboratory provides exposure to basic laboratory experimental techniques. This course is intended for non-majors and will not count towards a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): High school algebra. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 1401 - General Chemistry I


    4 hrs

    Foundational concepts of chemistry are studied, including introductory quantum mechanics, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions. Laboratory provides exposure to a wide variety of experimental techniques. Prerequisite(s): High school algebra. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 1402 - General Chemistry II


    4 hrs

    Continuation of CHEM 1401 ; emphasis on applications of equilibrium theory and includes solution chemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Lab experiments expose students to common qualitative analytical techniques. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1401  or strong background in high school chemistry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 3402 - Analytical Chemistry


    4 hrs

    Theory and practice of common quantitative laboratory techniques including gravimetric, volumetric, and electroanalytical methods. The laboratory is designed to equip students with the fundamental skills of basic analytical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1402 , MATH 1304 , or equivalent. Lecture two hours, laboratory six hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 3403 - Organic Chemistry I


    4 hrs

    Introductory organic chemistry course which covers structure, physical properties, nomenclature, stereochemistry, synthesis, reaction mechanisms and reactions of hydrocarbons and alkyl halides. The laboratory focuses on standard laboratory techniques and synthesis of organic compounds. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1402   Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 3404 - Organic Chemistry II


    4 hrs

    Continuation of CHEM 3403 ; emphasizes study in interpretive spectroscopy and in the synthesis, reaction mechanisms and reactions of the common functional groups and their derivatives; laboratory introduces organic qualitative analysis and continues the synthesis of organic compounds. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3403   Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 3407 - Instrumental Analysis


    4 hrs

    Introductory study of the principles and applications of instrumentation in analytical chemistry; methods used will include atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, uv-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3402  or school approval. Lecture two hours, laboratory six hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 4402 - Biochemistry I


    4 hrs

    Life processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins, including replication, transcription, translation and gene regulation; lab focused on understanding and using the tools of modern biochemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3404   Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 4403 - Biochemistry II


    4 hrs

    Continuation of CHEM 4402 ; emphasis on enzyme kinetics, metabolic pathways and biosynthesis. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3404   Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 4404 - Geochemistry


    4 hrs

    Examination of the Earth and Earth processes through the application of chemical principles; principles and application of crystal chemistry, geochemical thermodynamics, isotope geochemistry, and aqueous geochemistry; lab will involve participation by each student in the acquisition, interpretation, and presentation of geochemical data relevant to a specific geologic problem. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 1401  and CHEM 1401 , or school approval. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00 Also see: GEOL 4404  
  
  •  

    CHEM 4405 - Physical Chemistry I


    4 hrs

    Introductory study of the laws of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics with emphasis on chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, electrochemistry, reaction rates and mechanism; lab introduces studies involving calorimetry and reaction of kinetics. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3402  and MATH 2406 . Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 4406 - Physical Chemistry II


    4 hrs

    Introductory study of quantum theory, atomic structure, symmetry, photochemistry, and statistical thermodynamics; lab focuses on studies in spectroscopy, computational chemistry and related topics. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 3402  and MATH 2406 . Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Course Fee: $90.00
  
  •  

    CHEM 5416 - Selected Topics


    4 hrs

    Topics selected from chemistry intended to supplement teacher education. Note: Students may repeat the course for credit upon change in content.

Chinese

  
  •  

    CHIN 1401 - Beginning Chinese I


    4 hrs

    Introductory Mandarin Chinese course focused on listening comprehension, speaking, short readings, and introduction to Chinese characters and culture. Additional emphasis given to the communicative aspect of acquiring a foreign language. Note: * CHIN 1301 and 1302 may be taught at external campuses as three-hour courses without additional emphasis given to the communicative aspect.
  
  •  

    CHIN 1402 - Beginning Chinese II


    4 hrs

    Introductory Mandarin Chinese course focused on further development in listening comprehension, speaking, and reading, as well as basic composition and basic cultural understanding. Additional, intensive emphasis given to the communicative aspect of acquiring a foreign language. Note: * CHIN 1301 and 1302 may be taught at external campuses as three-hour courses without additional emphasis given to the communicative aspect. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 1401  
  
  •  

    CHIN 2301 - Intermediate Chinese I


    3 hrs

    Mandarin Chinese course focused on refining listening comprehension, conversation, reading, and composition. Continued enhancement of cultural understanding. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 1402 
  
  •  

    CHIN 2302 - Intermediate Chinese II


    3 hrs

    Mandarin Chinese course focused on further development and refining of listening comprehension, conversation, reading, and composition, as well as further advancement of cultural understanding. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 2301 
  
  •  

    CHIN 3300 - Conversation and Composition


    3 hrs

    Enhances student’s ability to listen, speak, and compose in Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    CHIN 3305 - Introduction to Chinese Literature


    3 hrs

    Overview of some of the major literary movements, authors, and works from beginning to present. Prerequisite(s):  
  
  •  

    CHIN 3316 - Topics in Chinese


    3 hrs

    Topics vary to include aspects of Chinese language, literature, or culture not covered in other courses. May be repeated once when topics change. Prerequisite(s):  

Communication

  
  •  

    COMS 1301 - Speech Communication


    3 hrs

    Survey of basic processes, theories, and skills focused on developing competence in various levels of human interaction. Emphasis on research, organization, presentation, and evaluation of oral messages and presentations. Note: May be taken to meet the general education communication requirement.
  
  •  

    COMS 1302 - Interpretation and Performance of Literature


    3 hrs

    Theories and skills related to the selection, analysis, adaptation, rehearsal, performance, and evaluation of readings from a variety of literary genres. Note: Recommended for students interested in performance as well as for students interested in media communication, acting, teaching, or the ministry.
  
  •  

    COMS 1303 - Professional Communication


    3 hrs

    Theories, skills, and practices needed for communicating effectively in professional and citizenship roles in organizational contexts. Note: May be taken to meet the general education communication requirement. Meets TEA standards for the speech requirement and for concurrent enrollment.
  
  •  

    COMS 2101 - University Readers


    1 hrs

    one (1) credit per semester up to three (3) units by participating in performing in interpretation activities and productions for the University, local or area schools, churches, or other organizations, as well as participation in interpretation festivals and competitions. Prerequisite(s): Current enrollment in communication program or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 2102 - Forensics


    1 hrs

    one (1) credit per semester up to a total of three (3) credits for participation in forensic activities: speaking in public or competitive situations, debating in public or competitive situations, or judging K-12 speech competitions. Prerequisite(s): Current enrollment in communication program or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 2302 - Communication in the Classroom


    3 hrs

    Survey of communication theories and skills applied in the educational context. Emphasis on knowledge and skills needed for interaction between teachers and students and facilitation of learning in a variety of modes and situations. Note: Should be taken on the sophomore, junior, or senior level to meet the general education communication requirement by students pursuing teacher certification. Prerequisite(s): one (1) course in education.
  
  •  

    COMS 2303 - Public Speaking


    3 hrs

    Theories and related skills for planning, organizing, rehearsing, presenting and evaluating a variety of speeches. Survey of rhetorical traditions, principles, and strategies in informative, persuasive, and ceremonial speeches. Note: May be taken to meet the general education communication requirement.
  
  •  

    COMS 3301 - Communication in Small Groups


    3 hrs

    Theories and related skills in group dynamics, interpersonal and intergroup communication, team building, problem solving, decision-making, conflict management and leadership roles. Emphasis on practical situations related to communication in public and professional contexts. Note: Recommended for prospective teachers, business leaders, religious leaders and civic leaders. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1301 , COMS 1303 , or COMS 2302 .
  
  •  

    COMS 3302 - Advanced Interpretation


    3 hrs

    Interpretation and performance of a variety of literary genre. Emphasis on traditional and experimental approaches to selecting, adapting, interpreting and performing in groups and as individuals in a variety of situations for a variety of audience. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1301 ,  COMS 1303 , COMS 2302 , or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 3306 - Argumentation and Debate


    3 hrs

    Theories and related skills for presenting and evaluating formal persuasive arguments and debates. Emphasizes on research and analysis of controversial issues, reasoning, use of evidence and appeals, use of effective speaking strategies, and evaluation of persuasive arguments. Note: Recommended for students interested in public issues, law or public debate. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1301  or COMS 1303 ; and COMS 2303 , or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 3310 - Interpersonal Communication


    3 hrs

    Communication theories and skills needed for success in personal relationships. Emphasis on verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills needed for building and maintaining productive relationships in intimate and social situations. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1301 , COMS 1303 , or COMS 2302 ; and COMS 3301  or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 4301 - Persuasion


    3 hrs

    Theories, skills, and strategies for presenting, analyzing, and evaluating persuasive messages. Emphasis on strategies used and effects and influences of a variety of persuasive media including the impact of modern technologies on issues, attitudes, beliefs and values. Prerequisite(s): COMS 1301  or COMS 1303 ;COMS 2303 ; and COMS 3306 , or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 4320 - Advanced Study in Communication


    3 hrs

    Individualized study in specialized topics for advanced students in communication. Emphasis on formulating proposals, conducting research, designing and organizing written and oral projects focusing on such areas as conflict management, crisis communication, health communication, aspects of diversity, and rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite(s): 15 hours of communication including at least 6 hours in upper-level courses or with consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    COMS 4330 - Communication Principles and Practice


    3 hrs

    Advanced theories and skills related to specific areas of study in the field of speech communication. Emphasis on practical application of communication concepts and skills resulting in the design, development, and written and oral presentation of a variety of communication projects for diverse purposes and audiences. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other course requirements for a major or minor in communication or completion of requirements for teacher certification in communication.

Computer Applications

  
  •  

    COSC 2311 - Computer Applications


    3 hrs

    Enhanced personal productivity and problem solving skills using knowledge work tools (spreadsheets, presentation graphics, word processing, database management, Internet and electronic mail); use of integrated software; design and use of small information systems for individuals and groups. Examinations available for demonstrated competency - waiver of requirement examination, $30; for credit examination (advanced standing), 1/3 campus tuition. Neither examination requires a proctor and neither examination is appealable. Failure of either exam requires the student to take and pass COSC 2311

Computer Science

  
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    CSCI 1305 - Introduction to Computer Science


    3 hrs

    Overview of the field of computer science, including concepts of computer programming with an emphasis on problem solving, critical thinking, logical reasoning, design and implementation techniques, and testing; background material if needed such as GUI operating system use and file and directory manipulation; and ethics issues facing computer science professionals. Programming will be done with a modern language such as Python. Suitable for non-majors with significant computer experience and for majors with no prior programming experience. Other students should take COSC 2311 .
  
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    CSCI 1311 - Programming Principles I


    3 hrs

    Introduction to programming and the discipline of computer science; analysis, design, implementation, debugging, and testing of software. Introduction to field for majors. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1305  or school approval.
  
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    CSCI 1312 - Programming Principles II


    3 hrs

    Advanced programming. Topics include basic data structures such as arrays, classes, basic inheritance, abstract data types, exceptions, recursion, and I/O. Fulfills Core Technology and Applied Science requirement. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1311  
  
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    CSCI 2313 - Data Structures


    3 hrs

    Comparative study of the interaction of data and procedural abstractions. Data structures, lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, sorting and searching, hashing, and graph traversals. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 2365 .
  
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    CSCI 2350 - Computer Organization and Design


    3 hrs

    Introduction to the organization and design of single-processor computer systems and assembly language. Topics include basic concepts of computer architecture and organization, assembly programming, I/O devices, interrupts, and memory hierarchy. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1312  
  
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    CSCI 2365 - Object-Oriented Programming


    3 hrs

    Introduction to object-oriented programming. Topics include object-oriented design and analysis, classes, inheritance, polymorph data abstraction, and user interface design principles. Prerequisite(s): CSCI 1312 .
 

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